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Liturgical Cycle

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ADVENT MUSINGS SUNDAY WEEK 4 2017

Brian Grogan SJ

 

MY LOVE STORY

Lord, is each of us a book telling the story of your love? Is mine a love-story too, in all its downs and ups, its shadows and its light-filled times? I think of my story as pretty ordinary, hardly a best-seller! My image of myself is of someone who has plodded along quietly; nothing very dramatic or unmissable seems to have happened. No publisher would want my manuscript—it wouldn’t sell.

 

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ADVENT MUSINGS WEEK THREE

Brian Grogan SJ

  1. THE DIVINE STORY

Dear God, I’m writing this with the memory of a London tower block that was gutted by fire. Hundreds endured smoke and fumes and some were burnt beyond recognition. Such a tragedy. And yet this is the world into which you make your quiet Advent, moment by moment, year by year. Your beloved Son endured as we do the pain of human life, and it cost him not less than everything. He endured the depth of human malice, but his love transformed it. The Gospel story reveals an astonishing expanse of love that encompasses our story of sin and evil, suffering and death. We are told that you ‘so loved the world as to send your Son to save it’ (John 3:16).  This was your Advent.

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ADVENT MUSINGS WEEK TWO

Brian Grogan SJ

  1. DO I REALLY MATTER TO YOU?

Dear Lord, recently I read of someone who felt that other people’s profiles were drawn in colour with magic markers, but that hers was sketched only in light pencil. I sometimes feel like that woman, almost invisible, unimportant.But am I missing something rich that is hidden in my life? Psychologists say that to become truly alive we need theloving gaze of another. Good parents across the world are the first to provide this loving gaze: it is steady, unwavering, and it lasts into eternity, whether we are aware of it or not.The friends and good people in our lives also help us to believe that we really matter. A loving gaze is followed by loving care.

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ADVENT MUSINGS November 2017

Brian Grogan SJ

  1. QUALITY TIME WITH YOU

Lord, over these Advent weeks please prepare me for your Coming! I ask this because my prayer is often a bit of a shambles, dull and unfocussed, and my days are a humdrum succession of bits and bobs—daily tasks, kindnesses given and received, interruptions, occasional glad surprises. Some days I don’t pray at all: instead I do ‘something useful’ like helping someone, or even writing pages like this! But I know I’m missing something when I don’t give even a little quality time to you, even if it’s empty.

 

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Remembering our loved ones who have died and are now with God.

‘Never ever doubt that we will meet again.

Until that happy day I will grow with God and wait for you.’ – Anonymous.

November is a good month for us in the northern hemisphere to remember those who have died, because nature is in decline – autumn is ending and winter beginning. When we visit the graves of those we loved, we gain a new respect for creation, down to its minute specks of dust. This is so because we humans are made of the dust of the earth and it has become sacred because through it our loved ones became human.

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PASSION, DEATH AND RESURRECTION

Brian Grogan SJ

Soon Christians will celebrate Easter. We form one third of the world’s population, and if we become attuned to the cosmic implications of the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus, we will bring a saving and hope-filled message to our Common Home.

Contemplation of the passion cannot be only a private devotion between Jesus and ourselves. We form one Body of creation, we are children of the earth; all of us are inter-connected, and Jesus, the divine One, is at the centre. His passion, death and resurrection must radiate out through us to all creation. ‘We bless you, because by your holy Cross you have redeemed the world.’

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Christmas Reflection

“He’s One of Ourselves!”

The poet Alice Meynell makes the point that the birth of Jesus simply made him ‘one of the children of the year’.  Since there was nothing outwardly distinctive about him,Herod has to butcher all babies around Bethlehem to ensure the elimination of Jesus.

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